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53 available technologies

Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus

The present invention is directed to particular human monoclonal antibodies and fragments thereof that find use in the detection, prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus infections. In particular, these antibodies may neutralize RSV. Also disclosed are improved methods for producing monoclonal antibodies.

Plasmid Based Reverse Genetics for Reovirus

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed an entirely plasmid-based system to better utilize reoviruses as a research tool. The system allows for generating a reovirus entirely from cloned cDNAs comprising three steps involving fairly well-known techniques.

A Two Stage ES Cell Differentiation Screen

Vanderbilt researchers have identified compounds that selectively differentiate stem cells into cardiomyocytes by perturbing key pathways. Medicinal chemistry is currently underway to develop lead compounds that maybe used for the treatment of damaged cardiac muscle.

Novel Esters and Amides Derived from Indolealkanol and Indolealkylamines as Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) Inhibitors

A compound of the formula ##STR1## where: n, and X are as defined in the specification, and the compound possesses selectivity for inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2.

Carboxylic Acid Amides as Selective COX-2 Inhibitors

A method of treating animals having cancer by administration of secondary amide derivatives of various COOH-containing drugs, such as COOH-containing NSAIDs, for instance, indomethacin.

Selective Reversible Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

A method of altering specificity of cyclooxygenase-inhibiting compounds that have a COOH moiety by changing the various COOH containing compounds, such as indomethacin, into ester derivatives or into secondary amide derivatives.

ARF and ARF Mimics to Inhibit Myc Protein Function

The c-Myc oncogene is bound by p19Arf, which inhibits c-Myc's ability to transform cells while augmenting apoptosis. This provides the basis for screening assays that examine the ability of various candidate substances to promote p19Arf interactions, or to substitute therefor.

Treating Glioblastoma by a Combination Therapy of Gamma-secretase inhibitors and Farnesyltransferase Inhibitors

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a novel therapy for gliobastoma multiform that results in minimal recurrence of the tumor. The therapy combines two inhibitors that effectively compromise tumor cell growth and survival. The therapy can be followed by radiation, a common treatment for cancer cells.

Tools for targeting and assessing force generation in kinesins

Kinesins are motor proteins in eukaryotic cells powered by ATP hydrolysis. These proteins are involved in various cellular functions including cell division. In particular, Kinesin-5 (also known as KIF11 and Eg5) is essential to forming the microtubule spindle structure in mitosis; therefore, this protein is a potential target for chemotherapeutics. Chimeric kinesin proteins, comprising one or more regions from at least two kinesin proteins, are valuable tools to study the molecular mechanism of kinesin function as well as to identify agents that affect kinesin motor function.

New Molecules Clear Chronic Infections by Disrupting Bacterial Energy Production Pathways

New compounds developed at Vanderbilt demonstrate a unique mechanism of broad spectrum activity to stymy antibacterial resistance. The compounds are particularly useful in chronic infections where long term antibiotic therapy fails, because it specifically kills small colony variants -- the bacteria that have developed resistance mechanisms. These compounds show promise in treating Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), and in overcoming difficult-to-treat infections in bone in cystic fibrosis patients. These compounds could be combined with new (and old) antimicrobial drugs to outwit resistant bacterial infections.

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