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41 available technologies

A Robotic System for Real-time Tumor Manipulation During Image Guided Breast Biopsy

Three types of technologies have been developed for assisting during breast biopsy procedures.

1) Many robotic systems have been developed to improve accuracy of needle insertions. Butthese systems do not compensate for tumor movement during the insertion. Hence multipleinsertions are typically required to successfully sample the tumor.
2) Steerable needle devices have been developed to guide the needle tip towards the tumor.Even though these systems may not require multiple insertions, they cause tissue damageinside the breast during steering of the needle.
3) Finite element methods have been developed to predict and compensate for tumormovement. The disadvantage with this technology is that geometric and mechanicalproperties of the breast are required for finite element analysis. The average computationaltime is approximately half an hour.

We developed a novel technology for guiding clinical breast biopsy. This system positions a tumor inline with the needle during real-time needle insertion procedures. This technology solves the following problems:

- Breast biopsies can be performed without multiple needle insertions
- Expedites breast biopsy procedures
- Does not need geometric or mechanical properties of the breast
- Tissue damage inside the breast is minimized

Diamond Triode Devices with a Diamond Microtip Emitter

This technology is a diamond triode for micro and power electronics. Diamond microtip field emitters are used in triode vacuum electronic devices, sensors and displays. Diamond triode devices having integral anode and grid structures are fabricated using a patented process. Ultra-sharp tips are formed on the emitters in the fabrication process in which diamond is deposited into mold cavities in a two-step deposition sequence. During deposition of the diamond, the carbon graphite content is carefully controlled to enhance emission performance. The tips or the emitters are treated by post-fabrication processes to further enhance performance.

Precision Pneumatic Robot for MRI-Guided Neurosurgery

At Vanderbilt University, a robotic steering mechanism for MRI-guided neurosurgical ablation has been developed. The small robot has submilimeter precision and is fully MRI compatible. It aims to replace current surgical practices with minimally invasive procedures in order to enhance the treatment of cancer and numerous neurological disorders such as epilepsy.

Flat-Cut Bit for Cranial Perforator

Inventors at Vanderbilt have developed a novel perforating drill bit for cranial surgery. Deep brain stimlation (DBS) has become a technique for the treatment of movement disorders, as well as obsessive compulsive disorders and epilespy. This cranial drill bit significantly improves the process of preparing the periphery around the cranial punch during electrode implantation, one of the critical steps during DBS surgery.

Sterile blood culture collection kit for reducing blood culture contamination at healthcare institutions

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a sterile kit to collect blood cultures that results in substantially fewer contaminated cultures compared to the current standard of care for collecting culture specimens.

Cuffed Inner Cannula and Flexible Outer Cannula Tracheostomy Tube

This new tracheostomy tube design prevents the need for decannulation when changing from a cuffed to cuffless (or vice versa) tracheostomy. It also enables a comfortable and fit in patients with both large and small neck diameters. The tube enhances patient safety by maintaining the airway at all times when downsizing or upsizing.

Magnetically Attachable Polydimethylsiloxane Stencils (MAtS)

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a unique system for patterning cells or proteins in cell culture environments using magnetically attachable stencils (MAtS) secured onto a culture surface by applying transbase magnets.

Rotary planar peristaltic micropump (RPPM) and Rotary Planar Valve (RPV) for microfluidic systems

A research team led by Professor John Wikswo of Vanderbilt University has developed a low-cost, small-volume, metering peristaltic micro pumps and microvalves. They can be either utilized as a stand-alone device, or incorporated into microfluidic subsystems for research instruments or miniaturized point-of-care instruments, Lab on a Chip devices, and disposable fluid delivery cartridges. The key advantage of this pump is that it can deliver flow rates as low as a few hundred nL/min to tens of µL/min against pressure heads as high as 20 psi, at approximately 1/10th the cost of stand-alone commercial syringe and peristaltic pumps. The RPV can implement complicated fluid control protocols and fluidic mixing without bulky pneumatic controllers. Both the RPPM and RPV can be readily optimized for particular applications.

System and Methods of Using Image-guidance for Placement of Cochlear Stimulator Devices, Drug Carrier Devices, or the Like

Vanderbilt inventors have developed and tested a device (C-in) and method that would shift the current invasive, risky surgical procedure of cochlear implantation to a less invasive outpatient procedure.

PosiSeat™: Assured Seating of Threaded Surgical Components

Vanderbilt presents an intraoperative device for taking the guesswork out of whether or not a threaded component is securely affixed to bone. This device is an anchor driver that automatically releases upon proper seating of the anchor on the bone of interest.

Patent Ductus Arteriosus Stent

Vanderbilt researchers have created a low-cost, removable Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) stent for pediatric patients. There is currently no commercially available pediatric PDA stent, but it is estimated that over 3,000 babies are born each year in the United States with cyanotic heart disease; a significant fraction of whom can benefit from temporary placement of the PDA stent described here.

Direct Laser and Ultraviolet Lithography of Porous Silicon Photonic Crystal Devices

We have developed a technique to process photolithographically porous silicon heterostructures and photonic crystal architectures, using laser and ultraviolet light exposure and a subsequent alcoholic bath treatment. This technique would be the first method to process directly the optical properties of porous silicon multilayers, heterostructures, and photonic crystal architectures.

System and Method for Measuring of Lung Vascular Injury by Ultrasonic Velocity and Blood Impedance

The present invention is a method for assessing capillary permeability to determine vascular lung injury without requiring the injection of radioactive material or requiring the sampling of blood. The method includes measuring impedance and ultrasonic velocity of blood flow through a lung. A hypertonic bolus is injected into the blood flow, and measurements of the blood flow are taken to determine the ultrasonic velocity and the electrical impedance of the blood. These measurements are used to calculate the capillary transport quantity, which is the product of the reflection coefficient for movement of fluid across the capillary barrier and the filtration coefficient. The measured value of the capillary transport quantity can then be compared to a conventional capillary transport quantity for healthy lungs, and one can determine injury by a significant decrease in the measured capillary transport quantity as compared to the standard measurements. Furthermore, a comparison of the osmotic transient graphs of the plotted indicator curves can serve to acknowledge lung vascular injury. Lung injury can be determined from the measured data when the point of osmotic equilibrium (where the indicator curve crosses the baseline) is significantly delayed as compared to the point of osmotic equilibrium plotted for a healthy lung.

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