Therapeutics

therapeutics

Tools for targeting and assessing force generation in kinesins

Kinesins are motor proteins in eukaryotic cells powered by ATP hydrolysis. These proteins are involved in various cellular functions including cell division. In particular, Kinesin-5 (also known as KIF11 and Eg5) is essential to forming the microtubule spindle structure in mitosis; therefore, this protein is a potential target for chemotherapeutics. Chimeric kinesin proteins, comprising one or more regions from at least two kinesin proteins, are valuable tools to study the molecular mechanism of kinesin function as well as to identify agents that affect kinesin motor function.
Licensing manager: 
Tom Utley
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New Molecules Clear Chronic Infections by Disrupting Bacterial Energy Production Pathways

New compounds developed at Vanderbilt demonstrate a unique mechanism of broad spectrum activity to stymy antibacterial resistance. The compounds are particularly useful in chronic infections where long term antibiotic therapy fails, because it specifically kills small colony variants -- the bacteria that have developed resistance mechanisms. These compounds show promise in treating Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), and in overcoming difficult-to-treat infections in bone in cystic fibrosis patients. These compounds could be combined with new (and old) antimicrobial drugs to outwit resistant bacterial infections.

Karen Rufus
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New Drug for Blood Clot: FXII Inhibitors to Treat Thrombosis

Thrombosis is the formation of a blood clot inside a blood vessel, which may cause reduced blood flow to a tissue, or even tissue death. Thrombosis, inflammation, and infections are responsible for >70% of all human mortality. Thrombosis is also the major factor for heart disease and stroke. 500,000 die from thrombosis every year in Europe. Inhibitory treatment of these conditions may also improve the outcomes of several non-fatal diseases. Researchers from Vanderbilt University and Oregon Health & Science University have jointly discovered new monoclonal antibodies that potently inhibit the blood coagulation protein factor XII (FXII), a critical player in the pathway, and anticoagulate blood. This invention provides foundation for commercial development of anti-thrombotic drugs based on new molecular entities.

Summary

Licensing manager: 
Janis Elsner
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Novel Fused Heterocyclic Compound as Selective BMP Inhibitors

Licensing manager: 
Mike Villalobos
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Inhibitors of Inward-rectifying potassium channels (insecticide)

This research targets IRK.
Licensing manager: 
Tom Utley
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Anti-Blood vessel/epicardial substance monoclonal and polyclonal antibody

This research targets Bves.
Licensing manager: 
Hassan Naqvi
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Generation of Neuroprogenitor Cells and Neurons from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by the Dorsomorphin Analog DMH1

This technology describes a novel methodology wherein human-induced pluripotent stem cells can be differentiated into neural precuror cells using DMH1 (a dorsomorphin analog). Neural progenitor cells can then be further differentiated into tyrosine hydroxylase expressing neurons.

Summary

This technology describes a novel methodology wherein human-induced pluripotent stem cells can be differentiated into neural precuror cells using DMH1 (a dorsomorphin analog).  Neural progenitor cells can then be further differentiated into tyrosine hydroxylase expressing neurons.

Licensing manager: 
Mike Villalobos
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Treating Glioblastoma by a Combination Therapy of Gamma-secretase inhibitors and Farnesyltransferase Inhibitors

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a novel therapy for gliobastoma multiform that results in minimal recurrence of the tumor. The therapy combines two inhibitors that effectively compromise tumor cell growth and survival. The therapy can be followed by radiation, a common treatment for cancer cells.

Summary

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a novel therapy for gliobastoma multiform that results in minimal recurrence of the tumor.

Licensing manager: 
Karen Rufus
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Novel Diabetes Treatment

Summary

Current therapies for type 1 diabetes (T1D) involve insulin replacement or transplantation of insulinsecreting tissue.

Licensing manager: 
Mike Villalobos
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Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Infectious Diseases

Using human B cell hybridoma creation, and antibody engineering technologies, Dr. James E Crowe Jr.'s laboratory has developed an array of antibodies from full length human antibodies to Fab fragments and diabodies. Many of these antibodies are ready for a cooperate partner who can further develop these antibodies into biologic herapeutics. The table below is a sample of the antibodies they are currently researching and have available. In addition to these areas of research, Dr. Crowe is actively seeking collaborative opportunities to identify new interesting targets for future antibody engineering projects.

Summary

Using human B cell hybridoma creation, and antibody engineering technologies, Dr.

Licensing manager: 
Hassan Naqvi
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