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Education, Community Organizations, & Nonprofits

Overview

Teacher in classroomThe Education, Community Organizations, and Nonprofits industry cluster is the cluster of fields primarily associated with assisting others.

From teaching to social welfare, if it involves using knowledge to make a difference in people's lives then you will likely find it in one of these fields:

  • K-12
  • Higher Education
  • Community Organizations
  • Nonprofits
  • Ministry
  • Social Services
  • Mental Health
  • Environment and Sustainability

Interested in receiving opportunities and information concerning this cluster? Sign up to receive  our listserv  emails for this cluster!

 

Resume & Cover Letter Samples

Elementary Education Resume
Secondary Education Cover Letter

 

Career Fairs

The Nashville Area College to Career & Teacher Recruitment Fair

This event, held each February at the Williamson County Ag Expo Park, brings together students from several area universities and more than 200 employers from industry, government and education. You must be a current Vanderbilt junior, senior, graduate student, or recent graduate to attend. An admission ticket (free) is required for entrance to the event. Tickets may be picked up from the Center approximately one week prior to the event.

Education Week

Most job openings in the education industry are posted during the spring. Each March, our office, in cooperation with Peabody College, hosts Education Week. This event brings in recruiters from school districts from around the region.

More information, including the list of participating schools, can be found in DoreWays beginning in February.

 

Sample Interview Questions for Teaching Positions

Listed below are some common interview questions for teaching positions. In responding to these questions, be able to provide examples of relevant experiences that support your answers.

  • What would I see if I walked into your class? How would you describe your ideal classroom?
  • How do you communicate with parents?
  • How do you incorporate diversity into your classroom? What does diversity mean to you?
  • How do you integrate technology into the classroom?
  • How do you view assessment?
  • How would a child describe you?
  • What is a favorite lesson you implemented and why?
  • How would students/co-workers describe you?
  • Why do you want to work for us?
  • What is your philosophy of education?
  • How do you handle discipline? How would you discipline a disruptive student?
  • Do you want your students to like you?
  • Is your instruction more teacher-directed or child-centered?
  • Tell us about your behavior management strategies.
  • What children's book has influenced your teaching and why?
  • How do you see yourself connecting to the local community?
  • How would you collaborate with your colleagues?
  • What are your plans to further your professional development?
  • Are you willing to be an advisor for extracurricular activities? If so, what types of activities?
  • What are your thoughts on team teaching?
  • If a student called you the worst teacher she ever had, what would you say/do?
  • If I were your principal, and we were setting goals for next year, what would your goals be?
  • Some people think you should demand respect. Do you agree or disagree?
  • What was the most frustrating aspect of your student teaching? The best?
  • How do you recognize student achievement?
  • How do you encourage students to learn? Can a student be forced to learn?
  • Do you ever get angry with your students? If so, how do you deal with it?
  • How do you handle noise in the classroom?
  • Tell me about a time you had to make a difficult phone call to a parent.
  • What special skills or talents will you bring to your classroom and to our school?
  • How do you determine whether or not you have been successful at your job?
  • Who was your most influential or favorite teacher, and why?
  • What has inspired you to teach?
  • What would you do if a student turned in a project that you believed was done by a parent?

 

Questions You Can Ask During an Interview

Interviewing is a two-way street. Prepare a list of questions you would like to ask the interviewer near the end of the interview (or when the appropriate moment arises). Keep in mind that your questions should reflect the amount of research you have done, rather than a lack of research. Adapt the sample questions below to meet your individual needs and interview situation, and create additional questions of your own.

  • What is your (the principal's) leadership style?
  • What are your expectations of the teachers in your school?
  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of your school?
  • What is the specific position you have open, and what are the responsibilities of that position?
  • How active are parents at this school?
  • What kinds of technological resources does your school have, and how might I be able to integrate those resources into my teaching?
  • Do teachers work in teams?  If so, how are the teams organized?
  • What is the student/teacher ratio?
  • What new programs will the school be implementing this year?  How would the person in this position be able to contribute to these new programs?
  • What major problems/issues will the school be facing in the next few years?
  • What are your school's goals for the coming year?
  • Is there a mentoring program available for new teachers at your school?
  • What is a typical day like in your school?
  • Will there be opportunities to coach or advise student groups?
  • What do you enjoy most about working at this school or for this school district?
  • Please describe the community in which your school is located.
  • What opportunities for professional development do you provide for your teachers?

 

Take Advantage of Summer Teaching Opportunities

Summer break is an excellent time to learn more about the field of education and to develop your teaching skills.  Any experience you have tutoring, teaching, or being a camp counselor will make you a more competitive candidate for full-time positions after graduation.  Instructing children during the summer is a great way to "test drive" a career in teaching in order to learn if this profession is right for you.

Get creative, do your research, and use your network to locate teaching, tutoring or counselor positions. And be sure to sign up to receive our listserv  emails which contain information on opportunities you can apply to!