Vanderbilt University
Department of  Religious Studies, College of Arts and Science

RLST/DIV 3830 Methods in New Testament Criticism
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celebrating diversity at vandy
celebrating diversity at vandy
 
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Here's a brief description of the course.  Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have questions, or you need to make clarrifications, or you want to discuss whatever class-stuff there is to discuss.  I would appreciate your suggestions on how to make our seminar more interesting and fruitful, hopefully, for everyone.

Daniel M. Patte

Garland 301, Box 1585 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 : Tel (615) 322-4884 : send comments and suggestions to webmaster


RLST/DIV 3830 Methods in New Testament Criticism
Schedule RequirementsBooks  |  Faculty  |  Notices  |  Assignments  |  Vumail  | Acorn
Course Description
This advanced seminar for Ph.D. Candidates in biblical studies (open to other students with permission of the instructor) will include:

a)  a review of a broad range of critical methods presently used in New Testament analysis--including textual, source, form, redaction, literary, sociological, anthropological, structural, political, cultural, reader-response criticisms. It is expected that the members of the seminar already know most of these methods; the goal of this review is to explore how these different methods are interrelated.
b) a parallel exploration of different paradigms which have served, serve, or might serve to integrate this plurality of methods in a practice of critical biblical studies–including historical paradigms, literary semiotic paradigms, feminist paradigms, post-colonialist paradigms, postmodern cross-disciplinary paradigms, and pedagogical/pragmatic paradigms (including Scriptural Criticism).  Once again, it is expected that the members of the seminar already know several of these paradigms.  The question is: what are the different ways in which they can be interrelated?
c) an on-going reflection on the ethical issues involved in the choice of a primary paradigm through an examination of the conception and practice of critical reading over time.


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