Lavender

a cart of harvested lavender


 


        Many pages on the Internet are divided either into specific ailments and then link to a
remedy or directly into the essential oils. Most provide a very enthusiastic report on each
oil.
         This report is from a home page that, as you guessed it, is selling the oils.
“Undoubtedly [lavender is] the most versatile and useful oil. NO home should be without
it.[It] Relaxes, Soothes, restores and balances your body and mind. [It] Calms or
stimulates according to your bodies needs.[and is] Excellent for refreshing tired muscles,
feet and head. Add a drop to the pillow/sheet before peaceful sleep.(...) Lavender blends
happily with many other oils. Lavender is a Must!” (http://www.fragrant.demon.co.uk/).
This page also cites that lavender can also be used  as a skin conditioner, astringent, or
muscle relaxant.
         The botanical or scientific name for lavender is Lavendula Officinalis.  Lavender
oils are obtained by steam distillation of the flowering tips of the Lavendula Officinalis
plant (http://www.ccdaroma.com/frag.htm). One may also find lavender listed under other
‘official’, ‘scientific’, or ‘botanical’ names such as: lavandula vera, or lavandula
angustifolia. It has been said that lavender was used by the Romans in their daily bathing
activities. Some also claim that both the Greeks and the Romans used lavender as a room
purifier to fend off the plague (http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/2248/lavender.html).
         Another page with a very spirited review of lavender was a page entitled Bird’s
Encyclopedia of Aromatherapy (http://www.imm.org.pl/bird/lavender.htm). Mr. Bird claims
that lavender can cure everything from genito-uninary problems to reducing stress to
treating acne and psoriasis and to even aiding in child birth!!! Here it also states that
lavender can stimulate the production of urine, it can treat acne (doesn’t say how it does
that one), and it can be used when one is in a hysterical condition and needs to relax. It
even says that lavender can repel moths! Mr. Bird seems to believe that lavender can do
just about anything, although he provides no information on how this ‘wonder oil’ works.
         Other sites provide a more (at least a little) believable description of the healing
properties of lavender. The Kavala Centre-  International Yoga School says that lavender
can be used to ease tension, tiredness and feelings of depression. It also says that the
gentle yet powerful healing properties allow it to be used for burns and insect bites. It can
also be used in a massage oil to soothe arthritis and muscle pains
(http://www.eclipse.co.uk/iys/h5.htm).
         It can be concluded that lavender is one of the most popular essential oils on the
market today. It can also be noted that the claims on lavenders healing powers are also
very lengthy. Some refer to lavender as a “sovereign remedy in the aromatherapy toolkit”
or “the single most useful essential” (http://www.top.net/harouffd/musthave.html).
 
 




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